EDITORIAL: Why They Should Rename The Boylston T Station After Me

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By: Malcolm Kelner ’16, Lion’s Tooth Co-Founder

Back in November, a group of Emerson students had the idea to rename the Boylston T station “Emerson College.” Their Change.org petition caught fire, garnering 889 signatures through press time. However, it fell short of its 1,000-signature goal, and received plenty of negative feedback for being a misplaced priority, a waste of money, and an affront to the station’s history.

I, for one, absolutely share those concerns. The station shouldn’t be renamed after Emerson College. It should be renamed after me.

Now before you think I’m just some privileged, self-indulgent attention whore, consider these facts:

  1. I lived on or near Boylston Street for four years while attending Emerson College. During that time, I accomplished many things. In addition to co-founding this publication, I participated in several different extra-curricular organizations at Emerson. I definitely “left my mark” on the Emerson community and the city of Boston as a whole.
  2. I used the Boylston T station almost every day. Whether traveling to Kenmore for a Red Sox game, Allston St. for my friends’ house, or anywhere else in between, I frequently used the Boylston stop and Green Line to go to and from my many destinations. Several times, I even bought semester T passes, and other times, I bought monthly or weekly passes. What better new namesake for the station than someone who patronized it so often?
  3. I spent a lot of time in the Boston Common. While I attended Emerson, on nice days, you could probably find me out there playing catch, taking a jog, or just chilling, soaking in the beauty of our country’s oldest city park—right adjacent to the Boylston stop. Good times!
  4. I think Boston is a top-5 American city. I’m not much of a traveler, but I’d definitely put Boston in the top five of my personal rankings. There are many things I like about it, such as all the sports, but perhaps most is that it is a “little big city.” What I mean by that is that despite the large population, it is easily navigable. You already know how I usually got around—the T—and of the T stops I used the most, Boylston would be number-one.
  5. I’m a nice guy, and have many friends. Over the years, I have built a number of great friendships with people both in and out of Emerson. If those friends were asked to describe me in three words, they would probably use, “nice,” “loyal,” and “cool.”
  6. I have read many of the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The Boston native is one of my all-time favorite writers, and I couldn’t be more grateful for his contributions to literature and higher education, especially his founding of Emerson College.
  7. I have personally met Lee Pelton. You see the picture above. That’s no joke. Not only did I meet Lee—yes, we’re on a first name basis—but we really hit it off too. We even did one of those “bro hugs,” where we shook each other’s hand, went in for a one-arm hug, and finished with a dap. He’s the man.

I think the whole “mic drop” meme is overdone, but allow me to release the proverbial microphone. As you can see, the only logical solution to the issue is renaming the Boylston stop after me. I’ve earned it. So please do your part and speak up to the powers that be, and hopefully we can make this happen. Thanks in advance for your support, and maybe I’ll see you around at the Malcolm Kelner station sometime!

Malcolm Kelner co-founded Lion’s Tooth along with Charlie Greenwald and Jeremy Vandroff in December 2014. He can be reached at malcolmkelner@yahoo.com or followed on Twitter @malc.

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